F*ck Yeah LGBT

Bringing you the news and stories of the community

33,058 notes

micropolisnyc:

Outside the Stonewall Inn, as a crowd was celebrating the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling, I met Don Russell, 84, and his 100-year-old partner, Charles Schaeffer.
These two men have been together for 62 YEARS. 
When they started dating, Harry Truman was president. It was an entirely different world for gay men, to put it mildly. 
"You couldn’t walk around like this," said Don, looking down. Their hands were clasped tightly together. 

micropolisnyc:

Outside the Stonewall Inn, as a crowd was celebrating the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling, I met Don Russell, 84, and his 100-year-old partner, Charles Schaeffer.

These two men have been together for 62 YEARS. 

When they started dating, Harry Truman was president. It was an entirely different world for gay men, to put it mildly. 

"You couldn’t walk around like this," said Don, looking down. Their hands were clasped tightly together. 

(via lgbtlaughs)

49 notes

National Organization for Marriage ‘outraged’ by ‘illegitimate’ court rulings

I love NOM’s website. It’s so poorly done and it’s breaking news bring me laughter. “Dump Starbucks!” - Yeah, good luck with that. “10,000 Marched for Marriage!” - Can anyone find me a number of how many people were at the Supreme Court supporting the overturn of DOMA/Prop 8? ” 1,200,000 Stand With Us!” 

(Source: projectqueer)

Filed under gay marriage

75,081 notes

latimes:

Scenes of celebration following today’s rulings on Prop. 8, DOMA

The Supreme Court handed two major victories to the gay marriage movement this morning, ruling a key part of the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, and effectively ending Proposition 8 in California.

You can read the full opinions of the court here, or just keep looking at the joy over the rulings captured above.

Photos: Charles Dharapak, Eric Risberg / Associated Press, Win McNamee, Justin Sullivan, Mark Wilson / Getty Images, Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA, Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

(via lgbtlaughs)

14,369 notes

humansofnewyork:

“We met when I left a funny comment on a blog post. I was living in Australia when I wrote the comment, and it made her laugh in Austria. So she sent me an email, and we began writing to each other everyday. Eventually we met. I was afraid the excitement would fade when we met face-to-face, but it never did. We got married last week, on the seventh anniversary of that comment.”

humansofnewyork:

“We met when I left a funny comment on a blog post. I was living in Australia when I wrote the comment, and it made her laugh in Austria. So she sent me an email, and we began writing to each other everyday. Eventually we met. I was afraid the excitement would fade when we met face-to-face, but it never did. We got married last week, on the seventh anniversary of that comment.”

10,043 notes

withquestionablewit:

Being queer doesn’t excuse you from privilege. You can be a white queer racist, a queer male misogynist, a cis queer trans*phobe, a wealthy queer classist, or any number of other oppressive things and the sooner you educate yourself to this the better off our whole community will be, because contrary to media depiction, queer people aren’t all white middle-class gay men!

(via projectqueer)

856 notes

diversityinya:

DiYA Author Spotlight: Alex Sanchez

Alex Sanchez is the author of numerous young adult novels about gay teens, including the Lambda Award-winning So Hard to Say and the Rainbow Boys trilogy. Sanchez has a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and worked for many years as a youth and family counselor.

“[Rainbow Boys] came about when I was dealing with some of my own coming-out issues, and writing, and I kept coming across, either in the news or in my work as a counselor, young people who were coming out. I was just so inspired by their courage and their stories that as I was writing the book it sort of took form in terms of teenagers. And then the more I worked on it, my vision, or goal, I guess you could say, was to write the book I wanted to read when I was a teenager.”
— Alex Sanchez in an interview with Publishers Weekly

“What makes covert prejudice so hard to confront is its very subtlety. One way writers can address subtle biases is to do what we do best: WRITE stories that reveal how covert prejudices work. Such themes will be particularly valuable in YA stories, as it becomes less acceptable to openly bash LGBT young people. Many kids who in the past may have been openly harassed, bullied, and ostracized will undoubtedly experience more covert prejudice as our society incrementally moves toward true equality. We need to tell those stories.”
— Alex Sanchez on the subtle homophobia that writers of LGBT stories sometimes encounter, in an interview with Malinda Lo

Visit Alex Sanchez’s website.

(via lgbtlaughs)