F*ck Yeah LGBT

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Posts tagged Day of Silence

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My Day of Silence video, presented in ASL 

Filed under day of silence

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loveincolororg:

April 20, 2012 marks the annual Day of Silence in order to generate awareness for LGBTQ bullying and discrimination. Supporters take a 24 hour vow of silence in order to represent the silenced voices of LGBTQ people around the world. Try going a day without talking for a great cause! 

loveincolororg:

April 20, 2012 marks the annual Day of Silence in order to generate awareness for LGBTQ bullying and discrimination. Supporters take a 24 hour vow of silence in order to represent the silenced voices of LGBTQ people around the world. Try going a day without talking for a great cause! 

(via space-roar-dinosaur)

Filed under day of silence

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humaninertia:

[text reads: SAFE ZONE I am an Ally.  This is a safe zone.  I am understanding, non-judgmental, and willing to provide an atmosphere of acceptance and assistance for members of the LGBT Community.]
Here is the classic ally stop sign in red (again) in honor of Day of Silence tomorrow.  I have this image taped to the back of various school notebooks and folders.  I do this in part to raise awareness for the cause and that it is well-supported, and also so that someone in need of an ally who doesn’t know me well can turn to me for help.  I will be printing copies of these images to give to other allies tomorrow.

humaninertia:

[text reads: SAFE ZONE I am an Ally.  This is a safe zone.  I am understanding, non-judgmental, and willing to provide an atmosphere of acceptance and assistance for members of the LGBT Community.]

Here is the classic ally stop sign in red (again) in honor of Day of Silence tomorrow.  I have this image taped to the back of various school notebooks and folders.  I do this in part to raise awareness for the cause and that it is well-supported, and also so that someone in need of an ally who doesn’t know me well can turn to me for help.  I will be printing copies of these images to give to other allies tomorrow.

Filed under day of silence

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I found two old notes I wrote to friends

This isn’t why I’m depressed, but you are the only one talking to me. She [my best friend] hasn’t asked why I’m upset actually… She hasn’t even said hello…

Later that year…

My day of silence was SO COOL! I’ll tell you all about it during the Night of Noise :) And mom said no one else would participate? haha! yeah right!

It gets better. ♥

Filed under homophobia day of silence

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In the wake of four student suicides egged on by homophobic bullying, Exodus Global Alliance has abandoned an anti-gay school program dubbed the Day of Truth.
Since 2005, The Day of Truth took place every year in schools across North America—strategically scheduled to occur one day after the Day of Silence, an anti-bullying campaign designed to draw attention to how gay students must live in silence and fear to avoid harassment. “I’m speaking the truth to break the silence,” Exodus’ pamphelts read, “Exodus network is mobilizing the body of Christ to minister grace and truth to a world impacted by homosexuality.” (Emphasis theirs.)
While Exodus took over the campaign in 2009, it was originally started by the Alliance Defense Fund, a Christian-funded legal group who unsuccessfully brought a school to court for suspending a student who wore a disruptive T-Shirt. “Be Ashamed,” it said. “Homosexuality is Shameful.”
It’s not surprising that Exodus wanted to take over the campaign so eagerly; it meshes with their mission perfectly. Exodus’ whole purpose is to promote the idea that gay people are morally corrupt, but can change through prayer and reparative therapy—a notion flatly rejected by all medical and psychological associations. Schools were also beginning to actively reject this message, having seen first-hand the dire harm that suppression and silence does to gay students.
As programs like the Day of Silence grew in popularity, Exodus felt more and more undermined by their effectiveness. Threatened, they lept at the opportunity to bring their unscientific message to schools, providing materials and instruction to schools across the continent. Their efforts immediately enabled bullies with anti-gay slogans and provided adult permission to spread messages of intolerance and shame, adding to the oppression and silence that gays already felt every day. It carefully nurtured the environment in which gay students felt so ashamed and hopeless that some would resort to suicide.
Fortunately, the Day of Truth is not happening this year. At least, not under the supervision of Exodus, who announced their abandonment of the campaign this week. The timing is not a coincidence, either. Just three weeks ago, four students killed themselves in separate incidents, unable to bear the harassment of their classmates. Candelight vigils were held in cities across the U.S. and Canada on Wednesday, and a successful online campaign has received hundreds of thousand of views, urging bullied students to keep hope that things will get better. Faced with growing outrage over the sentiment that they were actively promoting, Exodus had no choice but to end their management of the campaign. They offered no apology or regret, though, and their Day of Truth website now leaves a simple message thanking everyone who participated.
Exodus continues to feign compassion where convenient, but still heartily maintains that gay people are inherently evil and should be subjected to defunct therapies. They are still responsible for the attrocious Love Won Out conference, and for the incalculable misery of those subjected to their unscientific practices. And as long as they can spread this message, their affiliated lobby groups—to whom they ultimately answer—can point to Exodus as evidence that gay people don’t actually exist and therefore don’t need equal rights protections in the law.

In the wake of four student suicides egged on by homophobic bullying, Exodus Global Alliance has abandoned an anti-gay school program dubbed the Day of Truth.

Since 2005, The Day of Truth took place every year in schools across North America—strategically scheduled to occur one day after the Day of Silence, an anti-bullying campaign designed to draw attention to how gay students must live in silence and fear to avoid harassment. “I’m speaking the truth to break the silence,” Exodus’ pamphelts read, “Exodus network is mobilizing the body of Christ to minister grace and truth to a world impacted by homosexuality.” (Emphasis theirs.)

While Exodus took over the campaign in 2009, it was originally started by the Alliance Defense Fund, a Christian-funded legal group who unsuccessfully brought a school to court for suspending a student who wore a disruptive T-Shirt. “Be Ashamed,” it said. “Homosexuality is Shameful.”

It’s not surprising that Exodus wanted to take over the campaign so eagerly; it meshes with their mission perfectly. Exodus’ whole purpose is to promote the idea that gay people are morally corrupt, but can change through prayer and reparative therapy—a notion flatly rejected by all medical and psychological associations. Schools were also beginning to actively reject this message, having seen first-hand the dire harm that suppression and silence does to gay students.

As programs like the Day of Silence grew in popularity, Exodus felt more and more undermined by their effectiveness. Threatened, they lept at the opportunity to bring their unscientific message to schools, providing materials and instruction to schools across the continent. Their efforts immediately enabled bullies with anti-gay slogans and provided adult permission to spread messages of intolerance and shame, adding to the oppression and silence that gays already felt every day. It carefully nurtured the environment in which gay students felt so ashamed and hopeless that some would resort to suicide.

Fortunately, the Day of Truth is not happening this year. At least, not under the supervision of Exodus, who announced their abandonment of the campaign this week. The timing is not a coincidence, either. Just three weeks ago, four students killed themselves in separate incidents, unable to bear the harassment of their classmates. Candelight vigils were held in cities across the U.S. and Canada on Wednesday, and a successful online campaign has received hundreds of thousand of views, urging bullied students to keep hope that things will get better. Faced with growing outrage over the sentiment that they were actively promoting, Exodus had no choice but to end their management of the campaign. They offered no apology or regret, though, and their Day of Truth website now leaves a simple message thanking everyone who participated.

Exodus continues to feign compassion where convenient, but still heartily maintains that gay people are inherently evil and should be subjected to defunct therapies. They are still responsible for the attrocious Love Won Out conference, and for the incalculable misery of those subjected to their unscientific practices. And as long as they can spread this message, their affiliated lobby groups—to whom they ultimately answer—can point to Exodus as evidence that gay people don’t actually exist and therefore don’t need equal rights protections in the law.

Filed under slap upside the head day of silence

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wendyyyyyy:

Recently I started a silent protest called ‘Day of Silence’. This image was the logo I created for the event. Basically, the people who were doing it had to be completely vocally silent for 24 hours, and when people asked why they’d show them a badge saying they were doing the silence in aid of homophobia awareness (and the prevention of homophobia hopefully!). It was hyped up and talked about beforehand, and several of the schools (including my own) weren’t supportive of it so it became guerilla movement and I’m still not sure why.
Even if you don’t believe equal marriage is right or wish to know anything about gay/lesbian adoption rights it is unarguable that homophobia is a basic form of discrimination and has to be fought and stopped globally.
I’m asking you beautiful, quirky and intelligent people on tumblr to show your tumblove and reblog this and let people know about this. Show that you support that love is emotional and not in any way defined, specified or rational.
(the original website: www.24ofsilence.has.it )

Day of Silence is a really fun April event. You can learn more about it here.

wendyyyyyy:

Recently I started a silent protest called ‘Day of Silence’. This image was the logo I created for the event. Basically, the people who were doing it had to be completely vocally silent for 24 hours, and when people asked why they’d show them a badge saying they were doing the silence in aid of homophobia awareness (and the prevention of homophobia hopefully!). It was hyped up and talked about beforehand, and several of the schools (including my own) weren’t supportive of it so it became guerilla movement and I’m still not sure why.

Even if you don’t believe equal marriage is right or wish to know anything about gay/lesbian adoption rights it is unarguable that homophobia is a basic form of discrimination and has to be fought and stopped globally.

I’m asking you beautiful, quirky and intelligent people on tumblr to show your tumblove and reblog this and let people know about this. Show that you support that love is emotional and not in any way defined, specified or rational.

(the original website: www.24ofsilence.has.it )

Day of Silence is a really fun April event. You can learn more about it here.

Filed under day of silence homophobia

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Day 17 - Your first experience with an LGBT organization or event (Day of Silence, Pride, etc)

Day of Silence in middle school. The night beforehand I told my parents what I would be doing, and they were angry about it and worried for me (thinking I’d get more harassment) and wouldn’t let me wear duct tape.

School went…. pretty normal. My best friend was mad because I wouldn’t talk even though he knew what I was doing. I had to ask my art teacher something, but I think she knew what I was going through, so I didn’t mind talking to her. No one really noticed I was silent at all; I’m a very quiet person. The day was pretty much a fail.

When I got in the car, my dad teased me saying things like “You wanna go to Chick-fil-a??” and I nodded my head yes, and he kept on, “No? What did you say? Alright then. We’ll go home.”

Later that day though, I put on some duct tape and walked down the street with speaking cards in my pocket. I got some strange looks and then walked into my neighbors who insisted to each other, “Oh, it’s one of those… ‘If I were deaf for a day’ things…” but then I handed them a speaking card. They fell silent and a little dumbstruck, so I smiled and continued my walk. 

Filed under day of silence 30 days